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FIGHTSB4

Here’s Everyone That’s Suing Texas & Gov. Abbott Over ‘Papers Please’ SB 4

Senate Bill 4 isn’t just anti-immigrant and racist, but unconstitutional too - and from El Paso to San Antonio, Texans are fighting back.

Ed. Note: This blog will be updated regularly as more Texas cities and organizations join the legal fight against Senate Bill 4. 

Texas’ anti-sanctuary cities law is one of the most recent attempts by the GOP to institutionalize racism and discrimination. As was promised by progressives during the debate over Senate Bill 4 in legislature, the state of Texas, Governor Greg Abbott, and indicted Attorney General Ken Paxton are facing three lawsuits from local governments and advocacy organizations across the state over the constitutionality of SB 4.
 
Here is a list of lawsuits surrounding Texas’ “papers please” law:
 

City of El Cenizo, et al. v. State of Texas


Filed by: The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC)
Plaintiffs: City of El Cenizo, El Cenizo Mayor Raul L. Reyes, Maverick County, Maverick County Sheriff Tom Schmerber, Maverick County Constable Mario A. Hernandez, the ACLU of Texas
Defendants: State of Texas, Governor Greg Abbott, and Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton
 

 

El Paso County, et al. v. State of Texas, et al.


Filed by: The Texas Civil Rights Project
Plaintiffs: El Paso County, the City of El Paso and El Paso County Sheriff Richard Wiles, and the Texas Organizing Project Education Fund 
Defendants: State of Texas, Governor Greg Abbott, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, Director Steve McCraw, the Texas Department of Public Safety
 

City of San Antonio, Texas, et al. v. State of Texas, et al.


Filed by: The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF)
Plaintiffs: City of  San Antonio, City Council Member Rey A. Saldaña, the Texas Association of Chicanos in Higher Education, La Union Del Pueblo Entero, the Workers Defense Project, City of Austin, City of Dallas, City of Houston, City of Houston
Defendants: State of Texas, Governor Greg Abbott, and Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton